Tag Archives: doming block harbor freight

Soldering Questions

Last updated: 02/01/18 by: Nancy LT Hamilton

Moving a piece, that is incorrectly aligned, after soldering.

Does flux do more than just aid in soldering? Should I use a firescale protectant?

How do I know if my piece is fully soldered when sweat soldering?

Balled up solder, solder flowing into the wrong places

Making a prong setting, can you tumble pearls

Solder paste and color matching solder with metal

Solder balls up and doesnt stick

Several common soldering problems:  balling up, not flowing, join not tight, etc.

Color matching solder and how much solder to use

Soldering sterling silver bangles to make into rings

How to remove White Out after using it to block solder from flowing

Soldering Sticking to Charcoal Block

Is A Join Made With a Soldering Iron Strong?

How do I solder two ends together to be perfectly flat and aligned?

How Do I Differentiate Silver From Solder Wire?

What part of a torch flame is best for soldering sterling silver?

Solder Wont Flow When Trying To Solder A Bezel For A Cabochon To The Surface

How to keep solder out of patterned metal

have a torch, need to set it up? Heres how.

You need to understand what you are working with!

Important techniques for creating square edges like on ring shanks, tubing, settings, etc. pretty much any two pieces that you want to solder together!

Important steps before you solder.

Mark your solder before confusion reigns!

Extremely important information that every jeweler should know!  Dont risk your life or your health!  Know the dangers of metal dust?  If not, dont sand anything yet!

Creating Consistently Sized Spheres

how do you make perfectly round spheres?  You might need to know!

an important skill to have otherwise, you can damage your metal and work twice as hard!

Want broken wire?  How about melted wire?  Need your wire soft and bendable? These tips will help you to avoid these problems and work with ease!

DIY Fume Extractor for the Studio or Shop

One of the BIG ONES for studio safety.  Learn to make your own!

How to Make a Bezel and Set a Cabochon Part One

Want to solder thin material to thick?  Want to set a stone or two?  Learn how to create and solder bezels.

How to Make a Bezel and Set a Cabochon Part Two

Soldering Jewelry: How to solder settings, bails and wire. We solder dissimilar shapes and sizes of metal together, all the time.  Want to stop melting your settings or bails?  Can you solder wire without melting it?

Soldering Jewelry Sweat, Flush, or Applique Soldering

How to solder two pieces of metal on top of each other.  Learn tricks for successful joining of dissimilar sizes and how to apply solder.

My YouTube Soldering Playlist A list of all my soldering videos on YouTube.

Learn all about the material you use.

A huge page with so much more than info on Acetylene!  Learn all about torches, soldering and how to protect yourself!

Soldering related charts.  Includes things like: annealing temps, compressed gas valve sizes, what temperature does your gas burn at, what are the melting points of your metal.  Also, there are wire gauge charts, millimeter to fractions and inches charts, drill bits to wire gauge charts.  Lots of information!

nice to know if you plan on soldering anything!

On Pickle, Acid, Crock Pots and Baking Soda

How to remove the schmutz left from soldering, how to make your own pickle, how to use pickle and how to neutralize pickle.  Tons of info!

Why does oxidation occur?  Why do you keep getting fire scale, how do you get rid of it.  Learn the whys of what is happening when you solder and the solutions.

The 4 Steps for Successful Soldering

The 4 steps will help you to achieve soldering success!

How to mark your solder so that you always know what type it is.

Jewelry Tools Harbor Freight

Cheap tools for the studio!

:  Having a hard time squaring up the ends of your ring shanks?  Check out this tool!

See what others have had problems with and find the solutions!

How long to hold your annealing temps. Kiln annealing.

Balling up wire, tapering wire, work hardening wire, straightening wire and more!

They arent just for cookin anymore!

Removing Broken Drill Bits From Your Metal

-snapped your drill bit and cant get it out? Heres how to remove broken drill bits.

i.e.:  How to remove the copper coating you might get from pickling.  Also, how to remove copper from brass or bronze that comes to the metals surface after soldering.

:  Trying to figure out what you need to make fire in your studio?  Check out this information before you buy!

my list of basic necessities for soldering.

Youre looking at it!  One of the most asked after subject matter.  Many of my web pages have been inspired by soldering issues and questions.

Portable vs. regular torches, problems with torch, butane torches, water torches, setting up a torch safely, buying torches.

I was wondering if you could recommend a solder and flux to use with the annealed steel wire that I am using.

I am banging my head against the walls picking and choosing which solder and flux I need to get the job done. I like to make loops and try to solder the ends closed but i just cant.

I want to use this steel and my soldering just doesnt work. I dont know if I am not using the proper solder and flux or what.

I am cleaning it, trying a torch, just a soldering gun, which I dont think is really enough heat but, even the butane torch doesnt work.  I have a propane but I havent tried that yet. I am not sure if it is the heat or the wrong kind of solder and/or flux.

I just  tried it  and was successful.  I used binding wire (the same as you have, it seems) My-T-Flux, a butane torch and silver solder (hard).  Basic soldering principles apply:  clean metal, tightly fitting parts (no gaps), flux and even heat.  If you are trying to solder stainless steel, then you will have a problem.  That needs special equipment and materials but, for basic steel wire, this works.  Thefluxis at Rio Grande, as is thesilver solder.

Something in your process, obviously, isnt working.  It could be the solder type, not enough even heat, wrong flux or dirty metal or a combination of things.  First check that you are using the right solder with the right heat source.  Next check that your metal is clean (the solder should be clean too!). To clean the wire, drag it through sandpaper (wrapping the paper around the wire, as you do so) or use steel wool.  Wipe clean.  Also, check the fit.  Are the wires fitting together with no light showing through?  Is the fit tight?  Hard silver solder doesnt jump gaps, it works via the process of capillary action and this process doesnt work for large gaps.

Flux your metal well and your solder well.  Apply even, hot heat to both sides.  Bringing both pieces up to the same temperature at the same time, otherwise, the solder will run from one side and not stay between the wires.  If your solder balls up, something  the wire or the solder  is dirty or you didnt heat the metal enough. Sand or wire brush after, to remove oxidation.

A soldering gun is used with a different type of solder.  This is called soft soldering. If you are using hard solder, you need to use the butane or propane . This type of soldering is called hard soldering.  Both the butane and the propane gas torches are too hot for soft solder.  Soft solder melts at 300 842 degrees F.  Hard solder melts at temps from 1200 1490 degrees F depending on the type:  extra-easy, easy, medium, hard, it.  The gas flames from these torches reach anywheres from 3500F to 6500F. Way too hot!

See these pages on my website for more information on how to solder:

.  These should help. I also have a bunch of videos on

on soldering.  The soldering videos are filed in my Soldering playlist. Happy experimenting!

Moving a piece, that is incorrectly aligned, after soldering.

I made a ring. All went well until I was trying to fix a problem with the bezel. All is ok but, the top of the bezel is not smooth. Is there a fix?

question:  I started a pendant and shaped the body. Next I shaped the bezel and began soldering but, the bezel it is not quite where it is supposed to be. Can I move it. Or do I just need to scrap it and start over?

In your first question, I am assuming that you mean the upper edge of your bezel is bent or marred in some fashion?  If so, its an easy fix.

Turn the ring so that the bezel faces down.  Tape a piece of sandpaper (the roughness of the grit depending on how messed up the edge is) to your bench.  Using either 220, 320 or 400 grit sandpaper, sand the edge flat by moving the bezel, over the sandpaper, in a figure eight pattern.  If is really damaged, you can start by filing away the worst scratches.  Its easiest to hold the item in a vise or ring clamp so that you can file evenly or you can drag the bezel along a wide file.

If the edges are deformed (no longer parallel, maybe rippled) and you can still insert the stone, dont bother fixing it as the bezel wall will adjusted during the setting process.

If you cant fit the stone in, anneal (if hardened) and, using a burnisher, push the edges of the bezel out.  (Burnisher is inside the bezel).

The Answer to the second question is regarding moving a previously soldered item:  yes, you can move it.

There are two methods, that I can think of now. The first involves moving the bezel while the solder is liquid and the other involves removing the bezel and starting over.

In the first scenario, pickle and flux the entire piece.  Use a firescale/firestain preventative if desired.  Hold the piece, level, in cross lock tweezers or by resting on an even soldering block. Heat the piece with occasional flicks towards the bezel especially if it is a larger bezel.  Smaller bezels may need no heat at all. Keep heating the metal, moving the torch closer to the seam but, trying to keep the flame off of the bezel.  Always heat the largest, thickest pieces the most.  In many situations, the setting/bezel/applique, doesnt need any heat at all as the heat from the larger area will heat it sufficiently. Watch for the solder to flow and then gently tap or push the bezel in place using a soldering pick or other soldering tool.  Be very careful as the metal, in this heated state, can be very fragile and break or crumble.  Try to not overheat the metal.

The second method involves removing the bezel and resoldering.  Hold the piece in the air   with the part that you want to remove facing downwards.  Heat the back of the piece until the solder is liquid.  VERY gently tap from behind until the bezel drops off.  You can also hold it in a third hand or other contrivance and push it off with a solder pick. Sometimes, the bezel survives sometimes NOT.  Watch that your metal doesnt get too overheated as the tapping my crack or warp your piece especially with Argentium silver!  Sterling tends to crumble when pressure is applied especially, if it is very red.

Worst case scenario:  pulling or sawing off the bezel and removing any excess metal stuck to the pendant/ring.  You will lose the bezel in this instance and a new bezel can be resoldered.

Re-sand, reflux, replace and re-solder.

Since you are the great and powerful guru of silversmithing, maybe you can help me.

Flux is used at the points you intend to solder to aid in its adhesion. When soldering, do I need to protect the piece from fire scale with a boric/alcohol bath first?

I just purchased Batterns liquid flux and thought I was all set. Now I am receiving advice about the bath first. What are your thoughts? What brand flux do you use?

Total immersion or coverage would only be important if you were concerned with fire scale/fire stain because you were creating a mirror finish, at the end.  According to the research, that I just completed, if you are working with sterling silver, bronze, brass or gold (besides 24K) you should either:   Use a fire scale preventative that contains boric acid.  Check to be sure that the preventative can also be used as a flux.  See my updatedinformationon oxidation, fire scale and fire stain.

Boric acid and borax are not the same. See my section onFirescale/Firestain.

If oxidation is present in the metal, and it has been through several soldering/annealing steps, and you want a mirror finish, the heat from the buffing process will probably bring the copper molecules up to the surface in a random pattern.  It is explained more in the link above so, please check that out.

The reasoning behind total immersion is that the flux or preventative will reduce the amount of interaction between the 02 in the air and the metal, helping to reduce the quantity of oxidation and therefore, perhaps, reducing the chances for firestain/firescale to form on the entire piece.  Whereas, painting flux only at the join point only facilitates soldering and offers little to no protection to the rest of the metal.

Check the highest temperatures that your flux can survive at fluxes are not all created equal.

is effective at 1,1001,600F (593871C).

, at Rio Grande, is effective from 1,100-1,700F (593-927C) 200F higher than the Grifflux.  Once you exceed the effective temperature range of the flux, it is no longer doing its job.  So, reducing heat helps to avoid stain/scale by allowing the flux to remain active.   Check your fluxs temperature ranges and try to keep your heat from exceeding them.

, an anti-firescale and flux has effective ranges of: 1,1001,500F (593816C).  My thoughts:  if your flux is good until 1,700F and the anti-firescale is effective only until 1500F, Id just coat the entire thing with the flux.  Now, saying that, I have not run tests of the two, side-by-side.  That will have to wait for now!

Boric Acid and denatured alcohol anti-firescale and borax-based fluxes have effective temperatures in similar ranges so, without actually testing each type against one another, I cant recommend one over the other.

So, you can either run tests yourself or just use your flux and watch that you dont overheat your metal.  A smaller, hotter flame can help focused soldering so that the entire piece doesnt get overheated.

Another option to avoid fire scale/ fire stain is to not have a shiny finish.

:  textures, patterns, surface treatments, patinas, etc.

Argentium silver is also firescale/firstain resistant.  Actually, some say that it is impossible to create either.  But, Ive also read of people encountering firescale/firestain when using Argentium.  Whether they used the metal properly or not, I cant say.  The best thing to do is to experiment AND dont mix your silvers together as you may accidentally use the wrong material.

To determine the type of metal (if your silvers are mixed up), lightly sand then heat.  Sterling will turn black as will the Argentium BUT, if you remove the torch, allowing 02 to interact with the germanium in the Argentium, then you reheat, the Argentium will return to a silver/white color and the sterling will stay dark.  If you have fine silver, the color will not change to gray/black at all. Argentium info from Cynthia Eid.  See link below.

See Cynthia Eids post on Ganoksin:

How do I know if my piece is fully soldered when sweat soldering?

When I am soldering two pieces flat together and no solder is visible when its done; how do I know when the solder has melted. I have a tendency to over heat Im sure, which works right now as I am using copper, brass and nickel silver.  But, as I go forward, how do you know at what point is enough?

I like to see the solder on the edges.  When sweat soldering, place the solder around the edges  if the piece is small.  If it is large, place around the edges AND in the center areas. You should be able to see solder all the way around the sweat soldered pieces edges.  I do some sweat soldering in one of my recent videos:How to make a bezel and set a cabochon,  that might help.  There are two parts to this video not sure which part it is on. Dont forget to heat from the back.  Use a tripod or an enameling trivet or other mechanism to hold the metal off the soldering area.

I left a silver piece in the pickle to long. When I remembered and removed it (I am talking days in cold pickle) it has a gray coating on it. Looks like thick glaze. Is there any way to remove the glaze without damage. Help

From what Ive found, and Ive researched this a lot, the gray is actually an etched surface.  That is the best explanation Ive received after contacting several manufacturers and suppliers.  I think it was theSilver Institutewho supplied the info (but, am not positive). You can try torching it (annealing temp.) a few times, pickling it in between each heating.  If that doesnt work, abrasives might need to be employed.  Try3Ms bristle discsfor areas with patterns or recesses and sandpaper for the rest.  The etched layer isnt too deep (I hope).  Good luck and sorry this happened to you!  It has happened to me many times especially when Ive had to pickle metal clay.  Timers help.  Its so easy to get sidetracked in the studio!!!!!

I am having some of the pieces I work on stick to my soldering brick/block do you have this occur and do you have any ideas why and how to prevent this from happening?

You probably need to wash your soldering block.  Is it charcoal?  With charcoal, I turn it upside down in a bowl of water and let it soak a bit.  Then I use a toothbrush or other brush to scrub off any flux and goop that is present. Let it dry out a bit before using and be cautious of steam!

If it is a solderite board or a magnesia block, use a rough file or drywall sandpaper and sand down a layer until it looks clean.  Wear a mask!

With a ceramic board, (only do this with a cool board because hot ones will crack) immerse in water and do the brush thing.  Usually, sticking is caused by flux residue.

Heres a good resource for charcoal blocks:The Charcoal Block,  written by Mark Nelson, at Rio Grandes blog:Rio.

Why is my solder balled up and flooding the wrong areas?

The rules:metal must be very, very clean.  The join is tight.  The heat is appropriate for the metal. Flux.

Without seeing what is going on it is very hard to determine why your solder is not flowing where you want it to and why it is balling up.  It sounds like you are doing everything right. The only things that I can think could be the problem are:you are not heating the smaller piece enough.  When the solder flows around where you want it to go, it usually means the section where the solder is flooding is hotter than the other piece.Both pieces must come up to the same temperature at the same time. Dont forget the most important thing:  solder follows the heat.

Check the fit on your ring shanks again.The fit must be tight.Also,dont aim the torch at the solder. Youre not trying to melt the solder with the torch but, you are trying to get the metal hot enough so that ITS temperature can melt the solder.The seam (preferably from beneath the area where the solder is) should be the last place to put the heat if you need to hit it at all.  If both sides of the ring shank are heated evenly, the solder should flow.

Are you holding the ring shank in a pair of cross-lock tweezers?  They can act as heat sinks. Although, they are great for soldering ring shanks, wire, jump rings, bezels, etc.,   I often start my torch work by heating up the tweezers to discourage heat flowing towards them.

PS you can stretch that ring with a leather mallet and a ring mandrel.  Just hammer it a bunch on the upper edge, flip it over and hammer the other side.  If it doesnt fit, anneal it and repeat the process.  There are also ring stretchers that can help.Amazonsells several. Saying that, I own one and have used it 0 times.  So.

Sometimes, you dont get enough heat with those butane torches especially if the metal being joined is very thick and/or very large.  Another thing, when you burn off the alcohol, are you getting a lot of burned looking areas?  These areas could be inhibiting the solder flow. IF this is a consistent problem, you might consider a different flux.

Balled up solder usually means dirt is present somewhere.  Try cleaning your metal by heating it up with the torch, pickling, keeping yourCLEAN hands off the soldering area, brass brushing or sanding it and trying again.  The flame is the best cleanser I know of.  Balled up solder can also mean that you didnt get the metal hot enough for it to flow.

Experiment with some scrap metal.  Try combining different thicknesses and sizes together.

Soldering two different types of metal together can also be a problem.Copper, brass and silver all contract and shrink at different rates (with heat) so, one piece might be moving one way and the other piece, another.Also, metals like copper, brass and bronze create a lot of oxidation so you have to get in hot and fast before too much smutz builds up.

Why is my solder not flowing? What am I doing wrong!

I have a couple of questions for you:

Are you using the correct flux for your metal?

How large is the piece you are soldering to?  A jump ring is very small and really doesnt need much heat.  BUT, what you are soldering it to does.  Maybe you arent heating the main piece up enough.

What is a mini torch?  Is it butane or is it a Smith Little Torch?  Butane is not a hot gas.  It can be very difficult to solder large or even medium sized pieces with it.  Your torch may not be hot enough.

What is the solder doing?  Does it melt, ball up, do nothing?

Let me know and maybe I can help more. But first, please check out my web pages on soldering if you havent seen them already. Here are the links:  1.

The Four Steps for Successful Soldering.

Would you teach me how to create a prong setting successfully?

Is it safe to put the freshwater pearl in a sterling silver setting inside the Tumbler for a few hours of tumbling? Without doing so, how do I harden the sterling silver prong legs to insure the pearl is firmly guarded? 3) I soldered one prong fine but then, when I tried to solder the other prongs,  the 1st solder joins melted and the prongs fell over.

Sorry about the prong problems. Heres what you need to do:  First off it would be best if the pendant was not yet connected to the chain:  the greater the mass of silver, the greater the heat sink (the heat is drawn away from where you want it).

Solder all the prongs at the same time.How?

(1) Drill holes (in the flat base basically, whatever you are soldering the prongs onto) the

The hole needs to be a tight fit for the wire

a little hard twisting and pushing is a good thing.  If it is way too tight either go up a drill bit size, swirl the drill bit in the metal (in a circular motion) or use a round, mini needle file, to open it a bit.

every couple of strokes as it is really easy to over-file (and drill).  By using this method the prongs wont fall out or slide down. This technique also makes the solder join much stronger because more surface area is being soldered.  I always use this method when soldering ear wires too.

(2) When creating a prong setting that has prongs all the same height, mark even lengths on each prong with a scribe or a sharpie. This is to ensure that your prong placement is correct.

With uneven material like your pearl, you will probably have some prongs longer than the others. You can skip the scribing step (2) and do the following:  check the fit, make sure that your prongs are annealed, push the prongs into the holes, put the pearl into its location and gently bend the prongs over.  Make adjustments as needed a little more height or a little less.Dont over work the metal or your wires will break from too much work hardening.If youve been futzing with the prongs for a while, go and annealing them you can keep them in place in the main piece as they shouldnt fall out.  DONT FORGET TO REMOVE THE PEARL!!!!!!

(3) Push the prongs into the holes lining up your lines with the top of the hole (if required).  If they stick out the back no problem.  After soldering you just clip them, file, sand and polish.

Apply flux and a tiny piece of medium or easy solder on the side of each prong.

Use a firescale preventative, if desired.  See my

Heat up the metal not the prongs.

Keep the torch away from the prongs.  You want the solder to flow from the top of the piece, down the wire (inside the metal). Focus the torch near the first prong, then the second, etc.  Remember:

solder flows because the entire piece reaches flow temperature AND solder follows heat

.  Many people have success by heating from beneath.  See below.

(6) Are you using a charcoal block as a soldering base?

reflects the heat back onto the piece

.  Sometimes, I place the silver across 2 blocks of charcoal if the metal is thick (22 gauge and up) and sterling.

Do not overheat or do this with fine silver or Argentium.

All scenarios (overheating, fine silver, Argentium) will cause the metal to slump.  Another option is to

use a tripod and heat from the underside

.  The one drawback is that the tripod screen is a heat sink and will pull away your heat.  But, it does work and it keeps you from melting your prongs.  Never get the silver cherry red it will reach failure temperature (when is slumps, crumbles and loses its form) and then melt.

Dont put pearls in the tumbler.Tumble only the metal and then set the pearl.  Pearls are too fragile, like opals and other soft stones, for the tumbler.

The process of setting the pearl after tumbling will work harden the prongs.  If they feel a bit too flexible, they can be gripped with a pair of pliers and twisted A LITTLE!

Please see the my illustrations below they correspond with the numbered items above.  I do love a good visual!

P.S. practice on scrap first!If using copper as a practice piece, realize that the copper will behave differently than the silver.  If you mix metals, (i.e.:  copper base with silver prongs) you will have other results too as they put off different amounts of oxides AND they melt at very different temperatures..Practice, practice, practice.

For further research check out myWire and Sheet Metal page(metals are arranged alphabetically),The 4 Steps for Successful SolderingandAbout Solder

I have some old sterling silver bangles that I would like to make into rings. Can this be done and can I use solder paste for soldering. I would like to use the closest color match for this and dont know if I should use medium or hard solder. Also would I have to treat these bangles before I reuse them.

The best match for all silvers is hard silver solderbecause it has the most silver in it.  Please see myweb page on solderfor an explanation of solder types. Hard solder is usually used for the first several solder joins although, if youve practice, you can use it all the way through construction.  Because it has more silver in it then say, medium solder, it is also stronger.  Do you know, specifically, what metals that you are allergic to?  I ask this because (depending on the manufacturer) solder contains zinc or other metals.

Your solder paste is fine for any soldering operations although, I prefer wire. Use as little as possible saves on cleanup.  If you venture into my favorite new metal: Argentium, you will probably want to use Argentium solder.  See my page on this:Wire and Sheet Metal for more on Argentium. (Scroll down the page to Argentium Silver first of the silvers that I discuss).

You can cut those bracelets down and make them into rings with no problems.  I have several pages on soldering please read them for more information:Soldering,About Solder,Oxidation, Flux and Firescale PreventionandThe Four Steps for Successful Soldering.They should answer all of your questions.

BTW, color match is not that big of a deal if finished properly, (see myvideosand visit my web page onfinishing.) you shouldnt be able to see the seams even on copper, brass or bronze.

On treating the bangles before working with them:You will probably need to anneal them before trying to re-bend them.  This will take off any patina that has developed so, be prepared to re-patina them, if this is the look you want.

The solder burns up and sometimes just balls up and doesnt stick.  I bought some copper color solder and finally got two jump rings to solder.  I know the surface needs to be clean.  I did sand my practice pieces should that be enough to clean the surface.  My torch is a mini butane.  I think I should buy a max butane?

Your problem is a common one.My first question is why are you using copper color solder?  Does the solder actually stay copper colored?  Si

Soldering 101 The 4 Steps for Successfuloldering

Vermeil, Gold Plate and Gold Filled

Flex Shafts, Dremels and Drilling Tools

Jewelry Tools Tools at Micro-Mark

Soldering 101 The 4 Steps for Successful Soldering

Soldering Success The Four Steps

Step 2: Clean Metal/Solder/Flux/Hands

Torch Tips Choosing the correct size for the job

have a torch, need to set it up? Heres how.

Soldering 101, part oneandSoldering 101, part two

You need to understand what you are working with!

Important techniques for creating square edges like on ring shanks, tubing, settings, etc. pretty much any two pieces that you want to solder together!

Important steps before you solder.

Mark your solder before confusion reigns!

Extremely important information that every jeweler should know!  Dont risk your life or your health!  Know the dangers of metal dust?  If not, dont sand anything yet!

Creating Consistently Sized Spheres

how do you make perfectly round spheres?  You might need to know!

an important skill to have otherwise, you can damage your metal and work twice as hard!

Want broken wire?  How about melted wire?  Need your wire soft and bendable? These tips will help you to avoid these problems and work with ease!

DIY Fume Extractor for the Studio or Shop

One of the BIG ONES for studio safety.  Learn to make your own!

How to Make a Bezel and Set a Cabochon Part One

Want to solder thin material to thick?  Want to set a stone or two?  Learn how to create and solder bezels.

How to Make a Bezel and Set a Cabochon Part Two

Soldering Jewelry: How to solder settings, bails and wire. We solder dissimilar shapes and sizes of metal together, all the time.  Want to stop melting your settings or bails?  Can you solder wire without melting it?

Soldering Jewelry Sweat, Flush, or Applique Soldering  How to solder two pieces of metal on top of each other.  Learn tricks for successful joining of dissimilar sizes and how to apply solder.

My YouTube Soldering Playlist A list of all my soldering videos on YouTube.

Learn all about the material you use.

A huge page with so much more than info on Acetylene!  Learn all about torches, soldering and how to protect yourself!

Soldering related charts.  Includes things like: annealing temps, compressed gas valve sizes, what temperature does your gas burn at, what are the melting points of your metal.  Also, there are wire gauge charts, millimeter to fractions and inches charts, drill bits to wire gauge charts.  Lots of information!

nice to know if you plan on soldering anything!

On Pickle, Acid, Crock Pots and Baking Soda

How to remove the schmutz left from soldering, how to make your own pickle, how to use pickle and how to neutralize pickle.  Tons of info!

Why does oxidation occur?  Why do you keep getting fire scale, how do you get rid of it.  Learn the whys of what is happening when you solder and the solutions.

The 4 Steps for Successful Soldering

The 4 steps will help you to achieve soldering success!

How to mark your solder so that you always know what type it is.

:  Having a hard time squaring up the ends of your ring shanks?  Check out this tool!

See what others have had problems with and find the solutions!

How long to hold your annealing temps. Kiln annealing.

Balling up wire, tapering wire, work hardening wire, straightening wire and more!

They arent just for cookin anymore!

Removing Broken Drill Bits From Your Metal

-snapped your drill bit and cant get it out? Heres how to remove broken drill bits.

i.e.:  How to remove the copper coating you might get from pickling.  Also, how to remove copper from brass or bronze that comes to the metals surface after soldering.

:  Trying to figure out what you need to make fire in your studio?  Check out this information before you buy!

my list of basic necessities for soldering.

One of the most asked after subject matter.  Many of my web pages have been inspired by soldering issues and questions.

Portable vs. regular torches, problems with torch, butane torches, water torches, setting up a torch safely, buying torches.

Ive been asked about a million questions related to soldering/brazingwell, thats a huge exaggeration but, itisthe subject of many of the questions that Im asked and for good reason.  There is probably, no other technique, that causes as much fear, uncertainty and confusion, as soldering.  Soldering, and doing it well, takes practice.  But, given the right training and some hands-on rehearsing, everyone can solder well.

Most things can seem daunting at first glance:think of the messiest room that you can imagine(no, not my studio).  Then think about how youd feel if someone said:  clean it!  Overwhelmed (and probably a little irritated that you got stuck cleaning this imaginary room), you look around a bit dazed and confused.   But, turn on a good audio book, start in one corner, have a few storage boxes, a couple of hooks, a cabinet or two and time and before you know it, the room is clean.  Its overwhelming to  focus on the total scenario.  But, if youfocus on just one small spot,its manageable.  So, we are going to look at soldering by only directing our thoughts to small parts of the whole.

Ive broken, in this discussion of soldering, down the process, materials and tools.  As the many videos and webpages, listed above, attest:  Ive produced a lot of material on soldering.  Please take some time and check out my web pages and my videos.

So, like cleaning that messy studio, we will take small steps.

As you no doubt know, by now,soldering involves heat a lot of it.  We use a gas torch to enable our metal to reach the temperatures necessary to make the solder flow.  The solder bonds to the metal bycapillary action(think water moving up a paper towel). Whether you are working with any of the various silvers, golds or base metals (bronze, brass, copper, etc.)  the following techniques will be relatively the same.  Each metal has its own peculiar characteristics though, which will slightly affect certain parts of the process.  A few will be discussed in detail, later on.

Solder is the glue that holds the various pieces of metal together.In order for the solder to flow,the metal must be clean all of it including the solder and the flux.  The reason for this is that dirt, grease, oxides, etc.will create a barrier between the metal and the solder. Think of the dirty surface like plastic wrap over your ham sandwich (your potential solder join).  The plastic wrap keeps you (the theoretical solder) from your delicious sandwich.  It you remove the wrap, your mouth and the sandwich can join happily together.  (Is this the weirdest and perhaps worst analogy ever?).

Details on solder, itself, is discussed in detail in myOn SolderPage.  Discussions on solder in this section will involve its interaction in the soldering process and problems that can occur.

Ive come up with 4 different procedures that should ensure success when you solder. These steps are:

This just means that the two pieces of metal that you are joining together,fit as closely as possible.

In the instance of a Butt Join, such as you would use for a ring or joining a bezel together, Theedges should be flush and fitted tightly.  When held up to the light, you should see very little shining through.

When using round wire and tubing, you shouldfile a flat spot, on each side, of the pieces that will be joined together.  Not only will this make it easier to keep the pieces from rolling, during the soldering process, but, it will add strength to the join. Thiswill result in:more area for the solder to flow.

See my video:Flat Square Edges on Sheet Metalfor information on how to achieve a good fit. Also, two invaluable tools for obtaining square edges on metal, tubing and wire are:Miter Cutting Jig and Vise(See my page on this tool)Miter Cutting Jig and Viseand theMachinists Vise(AKA: Toolmakers Screwless Vise). There are alsoTube Cutting Pliersthat can be used for tubing and wire. They are also great for holding tubing and wire if you need to clamp it down:  for drilling, for filing grooves into it, etc.

Most people realize that their metal should be clean but what about flux and solder?  Another thing people forget about is their hands.  You might start out with sparklingly clean fingertips but, did you scratch your face, buff that ring or pet the cat right before setting up to solder? If so, you can bet your hands contain some form of dirt.

Your face contains a lot of oil glands so, while in the studio, get in the habit ofkeeping your hands off of your beautiful face.  Ditto for the cute cat.

You canwash your hands with a gritty soaplikeBoraxo.Some soaps have added moisturizers and could add a layer of oil to your hands.

Cleanliness is imperative for successful soldering because, quite simply, both the solder and the flux,will not flow across dirt of any kind:  oxidation, grease, and yes, dirt.  So, to ensure that you get a perfect solder join, wash up.

Dawn dish detergent and hot water works too.  Your hands will be a mess.  They will be dry, cracked, calloused. Your hand modeling career is officially over.

Cleaning your metal is discussed in my video:How to Clean Metal.Sandpaper is also an effective way to clean your metal.  It has the added benefit of taking the shine off of your surfaces.Flux doesnt flow well on shiny metalso, abrading your surfaces to be soldered will help ensure an even coating of flux.  I use 400 to 1000 grit sandpaper for this process.

After cleaning your metal,hold it by the edges, to reduce any contact with dirt.

Cleaning solder is pretty easy if you are using sheet or wire you just clean it like sheet metal. With the wire solder, I pull it through a

It gets crazy when you have to clean pallionsput your pallions into an ultrasonic cleaner.  Use a wire mesh container, like those used by watchmakers, to place your pallions in.  In England, you can get one atcarries a similar type.  Tea strainers are another alternative one with a fine mesh.carries one for 4 5 dollars, US.  Picking pallions from the bottom of the ultrasonic, probably isnt too much fun!

by dipping your flux brush into the container.  After a while, the bottle will fill up with debris and other contaminants (like bits of rusting steel from paintbrushes, bits of charcoal from your soldering block) and your flux will get dirty.  To save you from having to buy new flux just because its dirty use a small, low-walled container to put your flux in.

Tops of jars work fine.  Just pour in enough for the day and discard the rest.  Dont pour it back into the bottle!

There are alsoflux dispensersthat work great.  Although, after a while, they need to be thoroughly cleaned because the flux crystallizes when it dries.  The crystals inhibit the function of the dispenser.  But, it takes quite a while for this to happen.The dispenser keeps your flux clean and dispenses flux in controlled amounts.Amazonand other jewelry suppliers carry this product.Kingsley Northcarries them as doesRio Grande.

flux dispensersthat come in squeeze bottles with various sized

.  These work well, if you squeeze the flux into a little bowl.  Otherwise, they can flood the area with too much flux.

TIP:  After flux application, heat the flux until it glasses (the white bubbly stuff calms down).  Now, dip your paintbrush in a bit of flux, pick up a pallion of solder and place it on the (cooled but, still warm paint brush wont melt) metal.  The solder has less of a chance of bubbling off now. You can also ball up the solder first the solder granules dont flip off as easily.

Just an aside here:  use decent brushes for applying flux.  Cheap plastic brushes wont easily pick up and place solder pallions. Decent brushes make solder placement less frustrating. If you touch a plastic brush to hot metal, of course, it will melt.  The hair brushes dont survive unscathed either. But, you can trim them down and continue to use them.  I, generally, purchase a few, new brushes each year.  I, also,  like to have at least two different sizes on hand: one for larger areas and one for smaller.

There are brushes designed just for applying flux.  Rio, of course, sells one type:the non-contaminating flux brushin sizes 1 and 8 (larger). They are non-contaminating because they dont use steel to hold the bristles in eliminating any potential rust or steel transfer to your work.

There is also aBurn-Away Flux Brush.

You can also use small,Chinese bamboo brushes.  They have great tips and are relatively inexpensive.

One of the biggest problems in learning to solder is the fear/fearlessness of the torch wielder

which is just a reflection on the users inexperience with the tool.

Most students are so afraid to melt their pieces that they never quite reach solder flow temp.  Of course, there is the other extreme, whereevery soldering experience ends in liquid metal.   What to do?

Well, this is where practice comes in.Start with scrap metal.  Practice every type of join Butt, T or Strip andSweatSoldering(link to my video on Sweat Soldering).Solder again and again and be fearless.  If it melts, try again with less heat, less time.  There is nothing wrong with melting your metal if it is a practice piece.Melting a piece of jewelry that youve spent hours on is sooooooo depressing.  But, IT DOES HAPPEN!  Eventually, though, you and your torch will have bonded and the number of jewelry (jeweler) meltdowns decreases significantly.

One thing that will help you to achieve a flowing solder seam, is to have the correct torch tip for the size of your work.

So,those that are melters (you know who you are!)have no problem getting their solder to melt.  But, is it flowing?  Is it running along the seam or did it scale the walls on one side? Did it get so hot that the solder was absorbed by the metal?  Do you have pits?  (You overheated the piece and burned out the zinc in the solder!)

The Answer is: BYou want a torch tip, especially with silver, that will heat the metal up rather quickly.

Pure Silver(235(Btu/(hroF ft))is the bestmetalconductor of heat copper (223(Btu/(hroF ft)), is next in line followed, rather poorly, by gold (182(Btu/(hroF ft)).  Now, knowing these fact, you can understand why you need a larger torch tip (which results in a larger flame)!  When that fiery, ultra hot flame heats your metal,the heat starts to travel and it travels AWAY from the flame.So, in the example above, the larger tip (tip B)  is going to heat the metal faster.  It could take quite a while to heat this whole piece with the small torch tip.  Then, you would probably have developed a lot of oxidation and expended a ton of gas.  You would also be thinking about now:wonder if this solder will ever flow?

All items touching the metal you are soldering, especially metal, will pull away some of that heat, slowing down the process further.  The term heat sink, applies to the pulling away of the heat.  Sometimes you want a heat sink, like when you are trying to protect a prior solder join or a thin, small object like a stone setting.  Charcoal blocks absorb heat but, they reflect it back up onto the metal.

Torch tips come in a variety of sizes.  The numbering system depends on the type of torch you have.

So, if youve gone through your checklist of: fit, flux, cleanliness and the solder isnt flowing, think about changing tips.

Here are two flame charts fromRio Grande.  See how different the flame sizes are for the same numbers.  In my video, I compare the 2 tips.

Youll probably want to own at least two tips.  Three would be better.  In fact, thats pretty much all I use.  I have a small tip, medium and large.  The large tip is used for annealing, steel work, refining and for soldering large pieces.  The small tip is for tiny solder joins like a 3mm basket setting or jump ring soldering.  I use my middle sized tip for most of my soldering processes.

The next important information on heat is that,in order for the solder to flow, you must heat the metal on both sides of the join, up to solder flow temperature.  If you heat one side more than the other, the solder will flow to the hot side.

Dont heat the solder.  The solder is one of the smallest pieces of metal on your piece.  It will melt first but, wont do much except (if you heat it enough) absorb into the metal, maybe start eating away at the metal, resulting in pits or melt into a puddle.

When you are soldering silver (sterling and fine not Argentium or gold they dont conduct heat as well: see more information below) and copper, you want to heat the largest pieces first.

The drawing on the left illustrateshow to heat a piece with multi-sized elements.

As the black square gets hot, it transfers heat to the pink square. So, the pink square is pretty warm now.  At the same time, the small blue square is getting pretty hot too because, it is the smallest element there are less places for the heat to run off to and elope.  By the time you bring the torch to the blue square, the solder will probably be flowing or danged close. Usually, you dont even need to heat area three.

How can you tell when its time to move the torch?Watch your flux or the color of the metal.  The flux will get translucent near solder flow temperatures.  The silver will get light pink and the copper, brass and bronze will get red. The most obvious clue of all is that the solder melts or flows. Dont forget, copper, in particular, likes to create tons of oxidation.  Because of this tendency, you need toget in there hot and fast!Dont slowly heat copper up, if you can at all help it.

When soldering Argentium or Gold, the heat doesnt run like a mad woman.The heat tends to stay near the torch so, heating the entire piece is not that important.  You can direct the heat, with these metals, to the two sides, near the join, where you want the solder to flow.

When I solder, I move my torch in and out, heating and letting it cool, heating and letting it cool.  By removing the torch I can check for melting metal, solder flow and other indicators.  A light fast touch is needed when the solder is about to flow.

For information on the 4th step:Flux,please see my page:Soldering 101: Oxidation, Flux and Firescale/stain Prevention.

Excerpt from Oxidation, Flux and Firescale/Stain Prevention page:

Flux plays many important roles in soldering.

It creates a glaze, on the metal, which

protects the metal from interaction with the atmosphere.

when soldering when either paste or liquid flux reaches solder flow point, they become translucent.

Flux needs to be compatible with the metal being used

.  Use fluxes designed for the metal you are using.

.  If the heat present, surpasses the working temperature of the flux, the flux will no longer work.

1100F (593.33C) 1700F (926.67C)

1100F (593.33C) 1500F (815.56C).

, check to see if flux is included in the mixture.  If it is, you dont need to flux.

But, you might want to add additional flux to protect your sterling from firescale!

Flux is important for soldering, even if your metal doesnt produce oxidation, like fine silver orargentiumsilver.  It helps solder to flow.

Enter your email address below to get an email when I release new articles, videos and more!

The Rivited Portrait Pendant Trailer

Vermeil, Gold Plate and Gold Filled

Photoshop Tutorial Image to Line Drawing

Making a Heart Shaped, Enameled Pendant

Inspirations, Thoughts, Motivation for Jewelers

Stone Setting: Cabochons and Faceted Stones

Buffing Motors, Dental Lathes, Polishing Motors, etc.

Flex Shafts, Dremels, Drills and Other Things Like That!

3M WetorDry Tri-M-Ite Polishing Paper Chart

Annealing Temperatures, Melting points, Annealing information from Aluminum to Tin

BS Gauge in MMs and Decimals

BS Gauge to Millimeters, Decimals and Fractions: Common Jewelry Gauges

Drill Bit Sizes in MMs and Decimals (Smaller Sizes) with Closet Matching BS Gauges

Gas Oxygen Maximum Temperatures for Torches

Radial Bristle Discs: Grits and Colors Chart

Setting Burs and Drill Bits Comparison Spreadsheet

This chart presents the BS AWG Gauges and their closest matching metric and standard drill bits.

Wire Gauge BS, AWG and European Cross Section: MM2

Guilds, Directories and Other Resources

In the Studio with Nancy Past and Present Volumes

Jewelry Instruction and Information

Pin Back or Brooch Back Patterns Jewelry Making

Etching Chemical Recipes: Silver and Copper Nitrates and Copper Sulfate

Red Patina on Copper: Heat and Hot Water

DIY Jewelers Workholding System with a Ring Clamp

Flex Shafts, Dremels and Drilling Tools

Jewelry Tools Harbor Freight

Jewelry Tools Tools at Micro-Mark

Finding the Center of a Disc or Circle

Sculpt Nouveau Patinas and Metal Finishes

Acetylene, Propane, Mapp and Oxygen Gases Torches, Hoses, Regulators, Setup

On Pickle, Acid, Crock Pots and Baking Soda

Soldering 101 Oxidation, Flux and Fire Scale Prevention

Soldering 101 The 4 Steps for Successful Soldering

Settings for Irregularly Shaped Stones and Objects

how to remove ruger 10 22 barrel mounting block Shopping Onle

For more than 75 years, Brownells has been supplying shooters, professional gunsmiths, hobbyists, military/law enforcement and gun tinkerers with high-quality gun parts and supplies. Youll find over 90,000 products including unique gun parts, accessories, gunsmithing tools, ammunition and other products to maintain, repair, and upgrade your guns.

L.L.Bean is an American retailer recognized for quality apparel and reliable outdoor equipments. L.L.Bean products are designed to make it easier for families of all kinds to spend time outside together.

Cabelas dominates the outdoor industry with high-performance hunting, fishing and camping gear. Since their founding in 1961, strong brand recognition, unmatched customer loyalty and Cabelas legendary guarantee has cemented their reputation as the Worlds Foremost Outfitter?.

Bass Pro Shops is an outdoor retail leader in hunting, camping, boating, and outdoor clothing, in addition to fishing. They have become one of Americas premier outdoor retailers with destination outdoor retail stores across the United States and Canada, serving over 75 million sportsmen a year.

Bass Pro Shops is an outdoor retail leader in hunting, camping, boating, and outdoor clothing, in addition to fishing. They have become one of Americas premier outdoor retailers with destination outdoor retail stores across the United States and Canada, serving over 75 million sportsmen a year.

Commerce Content is independent of Editorial and Advertising, Hyperlinks to supporting retailers on

are automatically made into affiliate links, and if you purchase a product through these links, We may get a small commission on the sale.

Craftside

Traditional and Contemporary Techniques for Working with Metal and Mixed Media Materials

Metal-jewelry-making books tend to fall into three categories: technical soldering guides, PMC showcases, and craft-chain-style project books that assume premade, purchased components (including bead, wire, findings, and so on). This book sidesteps these standard categories by becoming a whole-craft guide for the aspiring artisan from outfitting the bench block to engraving metal pendants and setting beveled stones. Competitive titles are either tool or technique-heavy without including inspiring projects or they are heavy on the projects without motivating the creative energy from the core.The Jewelers Studio Handbookintegrates tools, techniques, projects, and creative inspiration into a single package.

Brandon Holschuhhas been a jeweler for nearly 20 years. He is a member of the Society of North American Goldsmiths and The American Craft Council. Brandon is an accomplished exhibitor, winning numerous awards and merits. Visit

Be sure to pop on over to his website, the photo on the opening page is of an AMAZING piece of jewelry!!! and over to Amazon to see more inside pages fromThe Jewelers Studio Handbook.

But why you ask am I so excited about this book? Because I just got a doming cube and I know very little about how to use it! Here are two pages that show how to cut and shape:

My first attempt at using my new tool I played with some recycled materials, I used a bottle cap and I tried the side of a soda can that I punched the circle out with a regular paper punch.

I cant wait to try new things with the help and inspiration fromThe Jewelers Studio Handbook.

Do you have a doming cube? What do you make with it? Leave a link or note in the comment section and as thanks youll be entered to win a free book of the week!

Posted at 08:41 AM inAltered ArtBeadingInside pagesJewelryQuarry BooksRecyclingUpcyclingPermalink

Dont have one myself, but got to try one during a jewellery course once. They are for a very specific purpose and Im sure I can justify another gadget. The effect with the bottle caps is rather cool though, and I do have a stash of them. Ill have to rethink getting one.

I dont have a doming cube, although Id love to get one (keep meaning to check out Harbor Freight, as Ive heard they have good prices on them).

Ohmigosh, I love what you did with the punch and the coke can – Ive heard of folks doing that but have never been brave enough to try it myself. But I have the punch you have pictured (and a ton of cans) so Ill have to give it a go! As always, thanks for the project.

Posted by: wendyFebruary 26, 2009 at 09:18 AM

Thanks for the great recommendation on this book. It looks wonderful. I have been doming some bottle caps. Now I have to figure out how to put 2 together to make a bead. I love your idea about the soda pop can. I may have to try that.

I have a doming cube in hardwood which works fine for thin and lightweight metals. I do need to buy some steel punches, or use those available at my college.

What was the new tool that was being demonstrated in the last photograph please? It looked like an upsutned punch of some sort.

Thanks fos showcasing this book. It looks well worth a purchase.

Posted by: SuellaFebruary 26, 2009 at 10:38 PM

Another great book! I dont have a doming cube but it sure looks interesting and something I need to check out. Love your blog. So many interesting crafts and techniques.

Used it with anything i could get my dirty little hands on- Check

Use it to make dommed silver and copper components for my jewelry-Check

I Love this book! I am usually just a little disappointed when checking out metalsmithing books, all for the reasons you listed. But this Mother bear! I nearly cried when i had to put it down to deal with the we have been here for EVER!! IM HUNGRY…candy? and did not have the brain power to handle the crisis and drool over the book. Went back the next day… IT WAS GONE!! I did, in fact, cry.

The comments to this entry are closed.

How to Make a Marie Antoinette Paper Doll with Lisa Kettell

How to Make a Ribbon Bracelet with Elaine Schmidt

Double Sided Coin Rings or How to Ru a Perfectly Good Quarter

About: Have always been a figure out how to do it kind of fellow, never having the right tool or experience just helped foster it along. Love the whole concept of sharing the HOW behind a project and have found…

Making coin rings is something I had been thinking about trying for a long time after stumbling upon a youtube video of others creations. I have watched numerous videos read some online tutorials and this is my take on it. I would like to globally thank all of you for helping plant the seed in my mind and get me started on this – some specific credits at the end of this instructable.

The legality of this has been talked about over and over, it is legal – no issues – have fun!

Note: Entered in the Metal working contest – please take a moment to vote if you like it.

There are a host of items you need for this and many I purchased were optional, I will detail each one as it is used.

The premise of this project is to make a ring out of a round flat piece of metal. The start for this is a hole in the center and then working the coin to bend the sides down. Getting the hole as exactly in the center as possible is going to make for a better end product. If the hole is off center then one side of the ring will be thicker than the other. Not unbearable for a Hey I made this type of project.

I generally eyeball the center, however a great suggestion I found used a washer. Cover the quarter with a washer as close in size as possible, then outline the center. This will help as a guide when you go to make the hole.

To make the hole I use a punch and die set I picked up from Harbor Freight (9 Piece Punch And Die Set – item number 95547 currently $29.99). The clear top helps center the coin. Be careful when using the punch set as you can see a miss with the hammer makes for poor results.

I position the coin with the black dot in the center as best as I can. There is still a bit of trial and error here. Once you are happy with your placement you proceed to punch out the hole. A small sledge hammer works nice for this, but I picked up a press (again at Harbor Freight – 1/2 Ton Arbor Press – $36.99) to push on the punch/die and cut the hole.

The size of the hole determines the width of the ring, the smaller your starting hole is the wider the band will be. The hole has to be at least big enough to fit over the tip of your mandrel.

The coin has to be worked into a ring. This is a very manual process where you hammer it into shape. To make this easier you need to soften the metal. This part of the process is called annealing. You will need a torch, I picked mine up in Autozone for $20. It came with the tip and a can of gas. I didnt spend the extra money on an ignitior as you can just use a household lighter.

You heat the coin until it glows a dull red. I have found that I prefer the look when I go to a bright red and scorch the metal. It gives it a tarnished look. I couldnt get a clear picture of that in this step, but have one later. Once the coin changes color you quench it. I just use water, but have seen other people recommend a pickling mix. The reason for heating the coin is to make it more malleable. You will see why this is important later.

*Note – you can skip the annealing process – it is just a little harder to work the coin and it will be more prone to splitting.

Once the coin is softened we have to start shaping it (soft is a relative term, do not expect that you can bend it with your hands). This is done by placing the flat coin over the tip of the Jewelers ring mandrel (Amazon $9.95) and then working it down by striking it with a rubber/plastic mallet (Harbor Freight 2 Teardrop Mallet $9.95). Instead of starting with a flat coin, I choose to get a head start on the process a simpler way – using my press and a doming block (doming block $40). I wrapped the ring in some paper towels, and using the parts that came with my doming set pressed the coin into the half circle steel form. The result is shown on the brick, this is a much better starting point than a straight coin. Before you continue any further you should sand the punched/cut portion of the ring, this will help prevent splitting as you continue to work the ring.

Tip: some people use 3/4 inch cut piece of PVC pipe to assist in working the ring. You place the coin on top of the mandrel with the mandrel on a hard surface, cover the coin with the PVC and strike the top of the PVC with your mallet. This will drive the coin down the mandrel getting it to fold over into shape. This process does work very well I stopped doing it as generally by the time you get to a point where you can work the ring without the PVC you are already into the larger sizes and you still have to flip it and do the other side. If you are making a mans ring though this might be a faster solution.

At this point I am annealing a second time to make the metal easier to work with. Once heated to red, cool in the water, then dry and push over mandrel with the side of the coin you want to be the outside of the ring facing up. Start hammering and working your way around the ring as you force it down the mandrel. Try to keep the ring even as you work. This is the art of the project and each time you do it you will get better at it.

Tip: for smaller size rings rest the mandrel on a piece of wood and roll as you hammer. This will apply force to both sides of the coin at the same time and the wood will prevent damaging the coin as you do it. Do not do this against metal as it will destroy the look of the coin.

Continue to work the ring down until the ridged edge is as close to the mandrel as possible. Flip the mandrel over and with a few good taps you can dislodge the ring. Put the ring back on the mandrel but this time the ridged part is facing up. Continue to hit the ridge of the ring to get it as close to the mandrel as possible. The goal here is to try and make both sides as close to each other as possible and true up the ring.

This is what the end product should look like.

Now it is time for the final touches. The ridged side has a small lip on it so it is nice to sand that off a bit. Holding the ring at a 45 degree angle rub it against a sanding block as you spin it in your fingers. This process will take some time. While helping make the thicker side a closer match to the thinner cut side it also adds a nice design element to the ring. If you sand enough you can get to the copper part of the ring. Repeat this process on the bottom of the ring to match the design and smooth out any more rough edges.

Once you are happy with your ring, it is time to clean it. The ring will be easier to clean if you have not annealed it. I used Mothers Metal Polish on them, it works wonders. Apply a little and hit it with the dremel brush (can also be done by hand) and you have a brand new ring.

Here is the end result. Each ring you make will get better and better as you fine tune your personal process. This ring was one of my first ones. Something I have since learned is use a much finer grit sand paper prior to finishing so the copper part doesnt appear all scratched up.

The scorching side effect of the annealing process adds a bit of depth and character to the ring. You can read liberty inside the coin, and make out the eagle wings on the outside.

Some tips I have learned after making this ring, rub the lettering and raised details lightly with steel wool or sandpaper prior to polishing – this will make the contrast more prominent, use leather around the ring when working it in the doming block and down the mandrel to prevent marring, to make smaller sizes start with smaller holes and adjust how you work the ring. The harder you strike it straight down the further you force it down the mandrel making it larger.

These make great little gifts you can commemorate special occasions by making the year of the coin the prominent feature, or in the case of state coins your place of birth or favorite place to visit.

Enjoy and feel free to ask any questions.

These are some other rings I have made, first on the left is a nickle, the rest are quarters with the exception of a ChuckyCheese arcade token. The nice thing about the ChuckyCheese ring is the text Where a kid can be a kid circles the ring.

The whole process can take a couple of hours but do not try to rush it. You could hit harder, try to bend faster, but to save 30 minutes will cost you the 2 hours that preceded it when the ring splits.

For this ring I was going for a larger mans size, started with a bigger punch and worked the ring down the mandrel using the pvc tube. I also didnt anneal the metal so the finish is bright and shinny. This ring came out at a size of 11.5.

Always hated that expression but wanted to toss some credit to the guides I found most useful when getting started.

Fencekid- The first video I found on coin making

Adam McSkinney- Lots of tips included

For other projects or info feel free to check out my website .

Please comment, ask questions, and share your own creations here or on my webpage!

Thank you for viewing and if you feel this is worthy please vote for me in the metal contest!!!

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

neat bunch of info you put on here, very informative with plenty of pictures & listed places to find what is needed plus hacks that can help too! very nice!

How Can One Man Cut a Log into Boards All by Himself? By Using a Logosol

At the Holz-Handwerk show there are tons of circular saws, tons panel saws and tons of CNC mills. But theres only oneLogosol M8 Portable Sawmill. This crazy contraption is something like a chainsaw combined with a tracksaw, and one man (or one Swedish man, anyway) can unload the thing off the roof of his Volvo, carry it into the forest, and start making boards.

Youre undoubtedly wondering, from the photos above, how that lone dude got that big-ass log up onto the stand all by himself. Its not just brute strength, theres design involved, as youll see around 3:08 in the demo video:

You gotta love that Logosol being a Swedish company, the M8 is designed to be used in the snow.

And yeah, I almost wish I hadnt come across this product; now Ill never feel like a man again buying my boards at a lumber yard or Home Depot.

Join over 300,000 designers who stay up-to-date with the Core77 newsletter…

Test it out; it only takes a single click to unsubscribe

Rain Noe is a writer and industrial designer based in New York City.

I had regulated this as dream-for-now, reality-in-retirement, but then I saw Harbor Freight sells one for just under two grand (and its pretty well reviewed). Now Im wondering how I can hide a portable lumber mill and a 2k bill from my wife.

Elon Musks Tiny Submarine Turned Down During Thailand Cave Rescue Mission

The Planet Envisions an Atmosphere of Confidence and Trust in the Workplace

The Middlecott Sketchbattle Experiment™ Returns Tomorrow Night in San Francisco

Product Designer Shunji Yamanakas Electric Scooter with Follow Functionality

Core77 at Holz-Handwerk, the European Trade Fair for Woodworking & Wood Processing

Hey folks, your correspondent is on the ground at Holz-Handwerk, a massive trade show in Germany covering everything under the sun related to woodworking and furniture building. Here theyve got machines, tools, jigs, inventions, contrapations, guys named Hans, and all manner of cool stuff that you can use to make…

Theres an entirely new direction for materials coming to lifespecifically, a hybrid that combines the best of non-living matter with living matter. Sounds sci-fi, but its here and its quite promising. Researchers at MIT have found a way to coax E. Coli bacteria to latch onto inorganic materials in order…

There is an exciting development in the works regarding materials science, one that will have a huge impact on product design.Developing new materials has traditionally taken an extremely long time. For example, in 1991, SONY and Asahi Kasei launched the first commercial lithium-ion battery, which is now the most popular…

Image via SeadragginLove it or hate it, the U.S. Mints forthcoming 3D coin seems to be capturing peoples imaginations. And while we previously looked at the cool production methods behind making coins here and here, reader Dan pointed out that we were remiss in not mentioning Don Everhart, the U.S….

By creating a Core77 account you confirm that you accept theTerms of Use

Please enter your email and we will send an email to reset your password.

A thread thread

I cant find the knitting and crocheting thread: this can go straight back in it, if its still around. But anyway, its autumn in the Northern hemisphere, so Ive picked up my needles again for simple projects to knit while watching Breaking Bad 3 eps at a time on Netflix.

Im looking for suitable projects for my stash. Project 1 was a hat for Ava, just a circular needle and some bobbly hot-pink wool, which has resulted in a nice double-sided effect: she can wear it bobble-side-out or bobble-side-in.

Project 2: I have 3 x 100g balls ofHerdwickwool. Its incredibly scratchy so I dont know what to make with it: I probably wouldnt want to wear it. Its grey and brown, and about medium weight I guess.

All suggestions gratefully received.

I had been thinking of starting up a crafty snopesters thread since Ive been working on a costume and figured others probably are working on some for Halloween.

Mines not for that, instead it is steampunk. Ive been thinking and collecting supplies for it for years, but only finally really got moving on it the last couple weeks. I had made a Victorian style corset in burgundy suede some time ago. Also awhile ago, I bought a old bridesmaids two-piece at Salvation Army, intending on using it for fabric, but the skirt fit me like it was made for me, goes with my suede, and is ankle length.

So, Ive been working on a bustle/tail/apron piece to go over it to make it look Victorian, out of a silk I got on really cheap clearance a few years ago ($0.50 a yard, since red tag fabrics were half off that week). It has a block-print style design on it, of flowers on the main expanse and a five-inch or so border of a more geometric pattern on one side. It is in pinks and burgundys, so it went really well with my other things. I hadnt considered using a print until I ran across it in my drawer, but I am very happy with how it came out.

I also made spats to go over a pair of boots I already own, out of the same burgundy suede. I had to design my own pattern for that, so I am pretty proud of myself. For buttons, I used a doming block to deform the new shield pennies, and glued them to normal shank buttons (inspired by epbot: Since I want to have copper as accent pieces, the pennies seemed the perfect choice.

The only thing I actually had to buy (since Ive been mentally working on this for years) was a hat. I bought a brown bowler, and have added burgundy ribbon and some feathers.

Except for anything actually steampunky (and I cant believe Ive been thinking about this so long and still havent come up with any good accessories), the only things still missing are something to wear under the corset (since its style basically leaves my breasts up there on display), and something to carry as a purse. I have cut a hidy-hole in an old book of the history of France, to use to hold my iPhone. Im planning at the moment to crochet some kind of a Victorian wristlet to carry things in. I have to dig up appropriate materials, but Im sure I already own something that will work.

The thing that finally lit a fire under my butt to work on this after all this time is a local Old West Festival that sounds similar to a renaissance festival. This weekend will be a steampunk theme. But, unfortunately, I think Im going to chicken out. It will give me more time to accessorize, though.

Ive also been considering my character. I want her to be an explorer, possibly a pilot (an embroidered pilots helmet is one thing idea rattling around in my brain, as well as tying up the front of my skirt and wearing breeches under). Because of my general anti-social ness, Im considering the name Miss Anne Thorpe. I think it is just subtle enough.

Wow, mags, so cool! And who knew there would be such a thing as a doming block? Nice.

Ive found a pattern for felted slippers, which I think I will have a go at with the wool. Most of the patterns I have seen involve basically knitting a big sock, including turning a heel, but this one is just made with big seamed squares.

Project 2: I have 3 x 100g balls ofHerdwickwool. Its incredibly scratchy so I dont know what to make with it: I probably wouldnt want to wear it. Its grey and brown, and about medium weight I guess.

In case you end up with not-too-much wool you dont want against your skin: trivets. Basically, wool squares you can put under hot pots to protect your table (or other surface). If you end up with lots of such wool: a rug.

Cotton can be made (quite mindlessly) into washrags, which are much better than commercial ones for dishes (maybe for faces, too; I never use mine for that).

Currently, Im finishing up a green cotton tank and starting some bluey-green socks. Ive also started spinning again, as I need a bobbin full of singles by the middle of October in order to demonstrate Navajo plying.

Find all posts by Seaboe Muffinchucker

I have a whole bunch of projects in progress. I cant seem to make myself finish them. Im working on a newwooleaterafghan. Im about 1/2 way through, but I just can make myself sit down and do it. I think Im using a hook that is too small, so I get frustrated. I wanted it to be tight, though.

Im making lots of scrunchies with some embroidery thread that I bought since it was on sale. Problem is that I have no use for all of these scrunchies. I could sell them, but Im not confident enough to do that.

I have a scarf that is in the works that Im using a double ended hook on, so its taking for-ev-er.

[QUOTE=Seaboe Muffinchucker;1769568]In case you end up with not-too-much wool you dont want against your skin: trivets. Basically, wool squares you can put under hot pots to protect your table (or other surface). If you end up with lots of such wool: a rug.

That sounds like a good idea! Why would there be a demand for such a scratchy material anyway?

Bumper sticker during my dog walking rounds:

I spin because knitting isnt weird enough.

Actually, you can knit a coat out of that scratchy material, if you plan it right and use something else for the collar and cuffs. Most really rough wool is intended for rugs or non-garment use.

I dont think spinnings weird. Now natural dyeing, thats weird (I dont have time for that, although I know a fair bit about it).

I finished (more or less) the cape I was working on for work. Since Ive started having hot flashes, Ive realized that I needed something like a cape–something that would cover my arms when I was cold, but that was easy to throw off when I got too hot. I dont have pictures, yet.

I also started a pair of socks. I still havent finished the tank because whats left is crocheting and I have to watch what Im doing, which means I cant read at the same time. I need to find a good show on Netflix so I can finish it.

I dont either–if anything, this person is probably quite the crafts(wo)man! IMO spinning, knitting, things like that are a way of connecting with the past and reminding us that there was a time when people had to make everything by hand! Many years ago, historians rebuilt a grain grinder at Mount Vernon using tools that Washington himself would have used, and god know there wasnt a Home Depot within miles of Mount Vernon back in the 1700s!

The sticker still makes me laugh though. I used to make necklaces for my own use, but Ive since given them away because I just dont wear jewelry like I used to. However there are some girls in this area that are loving them!

wool – Bowls are fun too. There are a few more on ravelry Id like to try when I get the right needles. Shaped hats too, I made one for myself but I need to line it.

For now Im working on Christmas gifts. Pinwheel sweater for my sisters step-daughter, mohawk hat for brother in law, slippers for grandma, windmill bag for my mom – if it turns out, its looking rather small. Though I am really itching to try dying some yarn with the marigolds I grew over the summer. (my first time with natural dyes. any tips?)

My mom got a hold of a bunch of old Workbasket magazines (60s – 90s iirc). It was fun looking through them, though many of the designs are rather dated looking. The 80s-90s sweaters, omg lol!

Though I am really itching to try dying some yarn with the marigolds I grew over the summer. (my first time with natural dyes. any tips?)

Dont forget the mordant, dont use any utensils from your kitchen (i.e., never mix dyeing and food), be careful where you dispose of the exhausted dye bath.

Oh, and expect the color to be different from what youve been told it would be (thats half the fun!).

Find all posts by Seaboe Muffinchucker

Thanks. never mix dyeing and food hehe, yeah, thats a good tip. Youd think it would be obvious but it didnt even occur to me. :facepalm:

I finally got my daughter to sit still long enough to learn to knit, shes nearly 13. I was suprised how quick she learned, though she got distracted after one row. and now the baby is into my needles so I need to go rescue them XD

You can get a really inexpensive doming block from Amazon for about $7. Im thinking Ill end up getting this one from Harbor Freight:

I thought that was going to be something for making hats. It looks like a good set, if youre into jewelry making.

Find all posts by Seaboe Muffinchucker

That one from Harbor Freight appears to be the doming block set I bought in their physical store. I dont remember how much I paid, but it definitely wasnt that much. Harbor Freight also frequently runs 20% off any item coupons.

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS St Francis

4698 S Whitnall Ave, St. Francis, Wisconsin, 53235-6052

Jones and Sons Locksmith Columbus OH

Evaluations of Harbor Freight Tools:

To evaluate this company pleaseLoginorRegister

Industrial Supplies & ServicesToolsPower ToolsPower ToolsIndustrial Supplies & Services St. FrancisTools St. FrancisPower Tools St. FrancisPower Tools St. Francis

Harbor Freight Tools – St. Francis – Wisconsin

Other search results for: Harbor Freight Tools

Harbor Freight Tools Quality Tools at Discount Prices Since 1977

Harbor Freight Tools is Americas leading discount tool store, selling quality power, hand and air tools at ridiculously low prices.

Harbor Freight Tools is now hiring for 200 jobs. Click to see additional information about this company and recommended jobs.

Harbor Freight Tools is an American privately held company that runs a chain of discount tool retail stores. The company was founded in 1968 by Allan Smidt, primarily …

Harbor Freight Tools. 65,702 likes 1,295 talking about this.

Harbor Freight Tool is a privately held American company that is known for selling tools from its retail locations at very competitive prices and the saving can be …

(626) 304-9272 At a certain age, little boys want to go to a toy store. They graduate to wanting to visit Game Stop. At some point in their life, they start …

Harbor Freight Clearance Tool Sale. Buy tools at clearance prices today! Tool Discounts changed every day. Offering a large selection of clearance tools, hand tools …

Average discount of $30.10 with these Harbor Freight coupon codes and promo codes. Get free shipping coupon codes at

At Harbor Freight Tools youll find one of the largest selections of brand-name tools, plus many items you just cant find elsewhere. Make Harbor Freight Tools your …

Harbor Freight – 135 results like Harbor Freight Tools Piece Doming Block and Punch Set, Harbor Freight Tools Electric Adjustable Compact Food Slicer with Tray and …

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS, 1301 Winchester Rd Ste 213, Lexington, KY. Tel: . Get Maps, Driving Directions, Phone , Reviews, for HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS

Find harbor freight tools from a vast selection of Gift Cards & Coupons. Shop eBay!

Buy harbor freight tools at BizRate, the best price comparison search engine on the web. Shop, compare and save when you buy online.

Research and review Harbor Freight Tools USA, Inc jobs. Learn more about a career with Harbor Freight Tools USA, Inc including all recent jobs, hiring trends …

Home. Free Catalog. Free Retail Flyer. Search. Order from Printed Catalog. About Us. Retail Stores. Customer Service. Inside Track Club Members. Security

724 items. Find huge savings on Harbor freight tools. Compare Prices & Read Reviews on Hand Tools, including top brands such as Case, Gates and Universal at .

(510) 793-5425 I have a Confession -Im a Tool Head.. I love to Browse Harbor Freight . They have some great deals on certain tools. While I usually buy Craftsman …

Aug 26, 2010(432) 362-2441 Hours: Monday 08:00 AM – 9:00 PM, Tuesday 08:00 AM – 9:00 PM, Wednesday 08:00 AM – 9:00 PM, more… Categories: Hardware & Tools ,

73 Harbor Freight Tools salary reports. A free inside look at Harbor Freight Tools salaries posted anonymously by employees.

8 listings of Tools in Houston on . Find reviews, directions & phone numbers for the best harbor freight tools in Houston, TX.

Any way to tell from a brand name which of the tools in Harbor Freight are quality? Chicago Electric – obviously crap. Is this a Harbor Freight brand? What about …

You found the harbor freight tools at m

$40 discount on 350 lbs. Capacity Locking Drawer Tool Cart at Harbor Freight, save money with Harbor Freight 2012 October Coupons, Coupon Codes, Promotional

1 ton arbor press modification

Sign in to add this video to a playlist.

Sign in to report inappropriate content.

Sign in to make your opinion count.

Sign in to make your opinion count.

Harbor freight, 1 ton arbor press modification

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

Upgrades for an arbor press (right out of the box)

How to Make a Snap and Rivet Setter from an Arbor Press and Dies

BOLTR: Dirty Secrets of Harbor Freight HERCULES Better than DeWALT?

Ratchet Arbor Press For Craft, Leatherwork etc.

More Improvement to the Harbor Freight 20 Ton Hydraulic Press

Using a dapping / doming block to make coin rings

Coin Rings from The Mint – Change You Can Wear

Harbor Freight Arbor press improved part 1 of 2

My Shop:Circular patterns-swirls on metal

Arbor Pressing a Black Powder Rocket Motor

Tinker Talk – Shop press bottle jack tip 1 – No cost mod

Quick mod to adjust the handle on an arbor press, without grinding the teeth!!!!

Machining 101: How to drill a square hole at home without special tools.

Curling the Edges of a Coin Ring without a Ring Press

BROACHING A KEYWAY IN A PULLEY tubalcain

Harbor Freight Air/Over Hydraulic Bottle Jack Review Item 69593

Coin Rings

Sign in to add this video to a playlist.

Sign in to report inappropriate content.

Sign in to make your opinion count.

Sign in to make your opinion count.

While making this video I forgot to mention what the name of the stainless steel block and it seems that no one wants it read all the posts below where I have answered this for everyone so Im going to answer it here again. It has 2 different names, one is a doming block, the other is a dapping block. You can get it a harbor freight tools or . Try to but it in 3 and no smaller than 2 1/2. It also comes with or without the round head punches depending on how much you want to spend. I have another video to show you how to use it to round over your rings at I hope this answers the question because Ive answered it below more than a dozen times now. Thanks and have fun at making yours.

When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next.

NEW Coin Ring Folding Tools! Hardened Stainless Steel Stabilizer Folding Cones and Spacer Set!

Make Double Sided Rings out of Coins – Tips for Beginners

Coin Rings-Finding Dead Center Of Any Size Coin Using Any Size Punch

Coin Rings: A Simple Trick for Figuring Your Band Widths (for the Swedish Wrap Method)

Making a Coin Ring the Machinist Way (DIY)

Cooking Bacon & Eggs In A Paper Bag – Tip Of The Week E34

Tutorial: Turn a Quarter Into a Ring!

How to make coin rings (short version) – Double Sided Coin Ring – How I do it

Jewellery making filigree wire silver ring

EZ Decoder: Easily Decipher or Bypass a Multi-Wheeled Combination Lock

ITS Tactical / Imminent Threat Solutions

Trapped ring puzzle/trick IMPOSSIBLE (not really)

Making Coin Rings with Folding and Reduction Dies; Coin Ring Tools

Can You Make A Ring Look Like Space?

Top Ten Jewellery Making Tools For When You Are At The Bench